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Can you be sacked for your Facebook comments?

In today’s society, employees are connected in many ways. Not only do they work together but if they are friends on Facebook or connected via LinkedIn, then activities outside of business hours are also visible and can be shared. Therefore, the boundaries between work and private life have become increasingly blurred. Employees should keep in mind how their posts, comments, likes or tweets could affect the relationship they share with their co-workers and potentially negatively impact their employer’s reputation.

Just because an employee is at home when the conduct occurs doesn’t mean action cannot be taken. Claims of bullying and harassment via social media are on the rise and it’s not an issue the FWC takes lightly. In some situations, a person’s employment may be in jeopardy where there is a sufficient connection between alleged misconduct over social media and their employment.

In a recent case heard by the FWC[1], it was found that the decision to sack a worker for making disparaging comments about his supervisor on

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SOCIAL media might be the "biggest gift" for any small business but be warned there are strings attached.

Experts have warned that, without proper training, it can do more harm than good.  And while some businesses bury their head in the sand, there is little escape.

 

BlandsLaw "has been able to mix it with heavyweight firms" thanks to its focus on the evolving social media platforms.

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/news/be-socially-aware-in-business/story-fnejnq06-1226499402893#ixzz2A5M8sFhe

 

A recent decision of Fair Work Australia should highlight to employers the importance of having a social media policy in the workplace.

The background to the case is that a Melbourne hair-dresser who, amongst other reasons, was dismissed after talking disparagingly about her employer on Facebook has successfully argued that her termination constitutes an unfair dismissal. The hairdresser was successful on arguments other than the Facebook issue, but the case still raises important issues about the use of social media by employees. Read the full article here