BlandsLaw - Blog posts from bullying
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Social media offers enormous business potential but can quickly become a headache for employers if it is misused by employees. A recent FWC decision includes the action of ‘unfriending’ a work colleague on Facebook as unreasonable conduct by an employee.

Facts

In a recent FWC case[1] a bullying application was brought by a property consultant who alleged multiple incidents of bullying behaviour. The issues were primarily between the property consultant and the sales administrator. The behaviour complained of included repeated conduct designed to leave out, humiliate and belittle the property consultant. This variously involved delaying administrative work for the consultant, ignoring her and other inappropriate behaviour.

The Facebook component, which has garnered media notoriety, occurred after the sales administrator attempted to block the complainant leaving a meeting room and likened her to a ‘naughty little school girl’. She then took to Facebook and unfriended the property consultant removing her from her list of Facebook contacts. This latter action was just one aspect within a larger pattern of repeated bullying

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Following a small number of other bullying orders, the Fair Work Commission has just made its first formal finding in a bullying application ([2015] FWC 5272).

Two employees of a small real estate business lodged bullying applications with the Fair Work Commission. They alleged that they had been bullied by a property manager who had belittled, humiliated, undermined and sworn at them.

The employees had made an internal complaint which had been informally actioned and was not conclusive. The two employees had not returned to work and had lodged workers compensation claims for their associated medical costs.

The Commissioner accepted the employees’ account of what had occurred and agreed that there was an ongoing risk of the conduct continuing. The ongoing risk aspect was interesting because the manager had subsequently resigned her position and then accepted a role within an associated business. Complicating matters the manager had since returned temporarily to her previous office location on a ‘secondment’ arrangement. Accordingly, the Commissioner deemed it appropriate to make orders to effectively

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A decision made by the Fair Work Commission has provided some guidance around what conduct will be treated as ‘at work’ in the new bullying jurisdiction.

The new bullying laws, in the Fair Work Act, mean that a worker can make an application and seek orders if they are being ‘bullied at work’.

The case involved a bullying application by three different workers against the Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) and DP World, a port operator. A full bench considered the definition of ‘at work’ in the context of allegations concerning inappropriate Facebook comments.

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A recent decision by the FWC has described an employee’s treatment as ‘heavy handed’ but found that it did not meet the definition of bullying under the Fair Work Act.

A childcare centre worker lodged a bullying claim against the childcare centre, the director and a colleague in respect of events that spanned several years. The issues in question involved two main issues: interpersonal conflict between the complainant and her colleague and secondly, the director’s handling of two disciplinary matters.                                                                                                                                                                        

The first disciplinary incident involved the complainant leaving steps out that could have caused a child to fall and in the second incident she applied the incorrect sunscreen on a child.The facts and differing evidence present a picture of a personality conflict between the complainant and her colleague. The complainant had a preference for some tasks over others and the communications between the two had at times been fraught on both sides. The alleged safety or disciplinary incidents were apparently undisputed but the complainant took issue with the director’s

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Twelve months after the introduction of national anti-bullying laws, Andrew Bland - Principal discusses the issue.

The recent annual report of the Fair Work Commission (FWC) showed the number of bullying complaints trending upwards. However, the numbers are nothing like what the concerned pundits predicted, nor has the new jurisdiction turned out to be the great threat anticipated to employers and their ability to manage staff, or so the FWC's capacity to deal with the flood of complaints.

In January 2014, as the new jurisdiction was launched, there were more that 28,000 hits on the FWC's website dealing with anti-bullying laws. But by the six-month mark, only 343 applications had been made.

There are many reasons why we haven't seen the spike in complaints forecast. 

It's probable many employees remain unaware of the regime and how to apply it. This may account for slow creep in the number of complains. When faced with an uncomfortable situation at work, many employees will simply leave. The other major disincentive is that there's

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Workplace investigations are becoming more commonplace, yet there is still a lack of understanding about the mechanics of investigations, and when they are needed. Below we set out briefly some of the reasons why you would consider an investigation, the key steps in the investigation process, and the pros and cons of different types of investigations.  

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