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Responding to Allegations of Sexual Harassment

Responding to Allegations of Sexual Harassment

When allegations of sexual harassment and bullying arise, it is insufficient for employers to simply point towards a sexual harassment policy in an effort to dissolve itself from legal liability. Employers have a responsibility to prevent and respond to instances of sexual harassment in the workplace.


This involves developing robust policies, monitoring policy implementation, regularly communicating policy content and providing ongoing training.

Where allegations of sexual harassment warrant the need for a formal investigation, it is imperative that the investigation is fairly conducted, and the evidence carefully considered. However, this is easier said than done when the alleged incidents are uncorroborated, and employers are left with the classic he said/she said scenario. 

In a recent case before the FWC[1], a mine technician alleged that he was unfairly dismissed for breaching the company’s equal employment opportunity and anti- bullying policy, when his employer concluded that he engaged in sexual harassment towards a 19-year-old female trainee.

The allegations, which were raised at the

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A Queensland tribunal recently found an employer was liable after it failed to properly investigate a sexual harassment claim brought by one of its employees. (McCauley v Club Resort Holdings Pty Ltd (No 2) [2013] QCAT 243 (13 May 2013))

The case involved a sexual harassment claim made by a food and beverage attendant against a chef with whom she worked. The attendant claimed the chef had made derogatory comments to her over a number of days and made growling noises in her ear and around her neck. 
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