BlandsLaw - Blog posts from Fair Work Act
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The Fair Work Act fights back to protect vulnerable workers

Following the outbreak of the 7/11 underpayments scandal in 2016, the Australian Government responded to the controversy by introducing the Fair Work Amendment (Protecting Vulnerable Workers) Bill 2017 (“Bill”). In September last year the Bill passed through parliament, bringing with it a series of significant amendments to the Fair Work Act 2009 (“FWA”) designed to prevent the deliberate and systematic exploitation of vulnerable workers, such as migrants and those who work in the franchisee sector.

All employers, particularly franchisors and holding companies, should be aware of the changes and how they are likely to affect business operations. Those who breach the new laws can expect to face hefty penalties, along with the wrath of the all-powerful Fair Work Ombudsman (FWO), who does not take contraventions of Australian workplace law lightly. The FWA amendments include the following:

  1. Introducing higher penalties for ‘serious contravention’ of workplace laws

Employers who engage in ‘serious contraventions’ risk facing substantial financial penalties, which now stand at $126,000 per contravention for individuals and $630,000 for corporations. A

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A recent Federal Circuit Court case* found that both the employer and the HR Manager had contravened the Fair Work Act (FWA) with the effect that both may face penalties for the contravention.

The case involved an employee who worked in a South Australian plant of a large glass bottle manufacturer. The employee sustained a shoulder injury at work. Following a significant period of time involving workers compensation and rehabilitation, the employer and the employee entered into a new contract. The new contract was for a modified role taking into account the employee’s limitations resulting from the injury. Nearly a year and a half after this arrangement was put in place the employer was advised by WorkCover SA that they no longer needed to provide alternative arrangements for the employee. The employer, through the HR manager, provided the employee with a termination letter and failed to pay out the full notice the employee would have been entitled to under the FWA.

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